A Meal Fit For A Cardinal.

20180722_2009383587985236722490872.jpg

Linguine With Chicken Ragù

Hello, happy Tuesday to you all, I hope you’re having a good week. It’s rather warm where I live in Southern California so I am always feeling a bit tired as the heat drains you during your activities. But I shouldn’t complain as I do have the lovely pacific ocean to cool off in.

Tonights meal is for the birds, no not really, actually a Cardinal, but not with wings, I’m speaking of one with maybe angelic wings.

To go forward with our meal we actually need to go backward to the origins of this lovely meat sauce. You see ragù refers to a meat-based sauce that is served with pasta. Ragù was created by Alberto Alvisi in the 18th century. An Italian gastronomic society, Accademia Italiana della Cucina, documented several ragù recipes. The recipes’ common characteristics are the presence of meat and the fact that all are sauces for pasta.

The first documented recipe for a meat sauce, in which the cooked meat was an integral part of the sauce served with pasta, dates from the end of the 18th century. The first ragù as a sauce, ragù for maccheroni, was prepared and recorded by Alberto Alvisi, the cook to the Cardinal of Imola (at the time maccheroni was a general term for pasta, both dried and fresh). The recipe was replicated and published as The Cardinal’s Ragù.

And there you have it, so now when you’re at some fancy Italian restaurant and you see the menu item featuring ragù, you’ll know it’s just meat sauce. But aside from all the history which I kind of like to sink my teeth into, ragù means it’s delicious, no not really, but you will think it is once you make this super easy, super quick recipe, it’s EJlicious. Have a great new day tomorrow and thanks for reading.

 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 boneless skinless chicken thighs, finely chopped
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped shallots
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2/3 cup dry white wine
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh rosemary leaves
  • 4 cups Marinara Sauce, recipe follows
  • 1 pound linguine
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan

Marinara Sauce:

  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 small onions, finely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste
  • Two 32-ounce cans crushed tomatoes
  • 2 dried bay leaves

Directions

Heat the oil in a heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken, season with salt and pepper, and cook until the juices evaporate and the chicken is golden, about 10 minutes. Add the shallots and garlic and saute until tender, about 2 minutes. Add the wine and stir to scrape up any brown bits on the bottom of the skillet. Add the rosemary and mix well. Add the Marinara Sauce and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer gently until the flavors blend, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the linguine and cook until al dente, stirring occasionally, about 8 minutes. Drain, reserving 1 cup of cooking liquid. Add the linguine to the ragu and toss to coat, adding some reserved cooking liquid to moisten. Transfer the pasta to a large serving bowl. Sprinkle with Parmesan and serve.

Marinara Sauce:

In a large casserole pot, heat the oil over a medium-high flame. Add the onions and garlic and saute until the onions are translucent, about 10 minutes. Add the celery, carrots, and 1/2 teaspoon each of salt and pepper. Saute until all the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the tomatoes and bay leaves, and simmer uncovered over low heat until the sauce thickens, about 1 hour. Remove and discard the bay leaf. Season the sauce with more salt and pepper, to taste.

Recipe courtesy of Giada De Laurentiis

20180722_2007534881632712970446391.jpg
Come on over I’ve got plenty.
Advertisements

One Comment Add yours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s